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Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Hiking the Mountain



After falling to sleep to the sweet and unfamiliar sounds of raindrops on Saturday, I dreamed of water soaked fields and quenched roots, filling and feeding the cells of our needy plants and cracked soil.  When morning came, I slowly opened my eyes just a sliver, hoping for gray skies and a sleepy dog, curled beside me.  I pulled the floral bedroom curtain aside, really just a square piece of random fabric rummaged from the thrift store, and watched as the sunlight poured into my room, rousing the dog and making me frown just a little.  Even though the air felt cool, the sun warm on my face, filling my room with light, I couldn’t help but feel lonesome and left wanting for a really good rainy day.

I didn’t dwell too long in my sunny day pout.  The dog barked me right out of bed and we strolled down the farm road, greeting the people picking tomatoes for the preservation class on my way to set up irrigation in our winter radish field.  With the water set up and the sun still out, I decided to leave the farm, whose dry soil and aging tomato plants were starting to make me feel a little weary on my one day off.  I packed a lunch, grabbed the dog and drove out to Wachusett Mountain.  I had never climbed to the top and today was the day.

On the ride out to the nearby peak, listening to a really great Jenny Lewis album that makes me smile and reminds me of my sister, I remember the mountain metaphor that I wrote many years ago and feel compelled to force my farm crew to hear year after year.   Several seasons ago I wanted to express to a new crew what was in store for them.  Perhaps there isn’t much that can prepare a beginning farmer for the hours of weeding, hot sun, dirty hands and simply exhausted months that they are about to embark on for most of their waking hours.  But I wanted to try to give our team the sense of the ups and downs that a farm season can bring.  Climbing a mountain, or the entire endeavor of going on a serious mountain climb with a group of strangers, seemed a suitable metaphor.

So at the end of the first week of our farm season each year for the past several years, I read out loud my “mountain metaphor” to our crew.  It describes the excitement of a new season and how spring will be filled with getting to know new coworkers and the awkward ways our bodies will readjust to the physical work of farming.  It describes early summer and how wonderful it feels to pull the first harvests out of the fields, the feeling of displaying our crops in the barn and sharing the harvest for the first time.  I go on to remind (or maybe to reassure) us that at some point in late summer, harvesting that once was so exciting, can feel tedious, difficult or even challenging in its repetitiveness.  I may even suggest that the stories and quirks of our co-workers that once seemed so lovely may become somewhat irksome.  But, I follow this, with the promise of fall. That the late summer heat, and challenges are lightened once fall arrives.  The weeds slow down, the tasks seem (even if they aren’t) less urgent.  The chill in the mornings allows for layering in cozy sweaters and hats as we harvest and soon that same lettuce is as beautiful as it once was in the spring.  And after fall is winter, the end of a season.  A celebration awaits us and a reflection of all the things we loved, all the successes we shared, all the things we learned, all the ways we want to grow, change, improve.  And then we plan to do it all again.

I parked my car, let the dog out, pulled my soft, blue backpack out of my car, filled only with water, snacks and an extra sweater and began to climb this small mountain on Sunday.  Henry led the way and I followed close behind, focused on each step as I climbed and navigated the slightly steep, rocky trail.  The farm season has so many peaks—the first harvest, the first time a new apprentice really learns how to drive a cultivating tractor, the first time we work with our summer crew, the first bite of tomato, the first big broccoli harvest.  A Farm isn’t climbing just one mountain. It’s climbing an entire mountain range.  Every day, every week, every month there are peaks and views to admire, good snacks to eat at the top.  And every day, every week, every month there are those hard climbs, those difficult descents, those challenging moments with your fellow hikers (or weather that just won’t do what you want).  I love being on the hike.   With every step, I felt focused and proud and satisfied, just like I do during a good day of farming.  And I even made it to the top.


See you at the farm, or on the mountain,


Meryl & the Powisset farm crew



What’s in the share:

Full & small: lettuce, choice of greens, potatoes, beets, carrots, tomatoes, tomatillos, hot peppers, leeks, onions, (choice for small), popcorn
PYO: cherry toms (almost gone), husk cherries, raspberries, flowers



Hello from the Powisset Farm Kitchen!

We are grateful that so many of your have inquired about using the Farm Kitchen for so many different cooking and food related projects!  Whether you want to try a new recipe, bake large quantities of food, we are excited to offer our Farm Kitchen as a community resource! Please join us for “Kitchen Improv” at Powisset Farm. During the hours of our remaining CSA pick-up times we welcome you to use the kitchen for any kind of food production as long as you are not intending to sell what you’re making (we do not yet have the proper licenses to make this happen and we hope to offer this as an option sooner than later). Please fill out the doodle poll to secure your time slot and then email Rachel with what you intend to make/prepare. We look forward to seeing you in the Farm Kitchen! **requests for use of "kitchen improv" time must be approved by farm staff**


Also coming soon to the Farm Kitchen – The next Powisset Cooks Workshop!
Tuesday, September 23 | 5:30-7:30PM

Herbs are one of the many unsung culinary heroes; when used well, herbs can add so much depth and flavor to a dish. Join Powisset Cooks! in the field for a short harvest followed by an exciting hands-on exploration in the kitchen with our Culinary Educator. You will learn new and easy ways to infuse herbs into breads, sauces and more. Limited to 12 participants, so sign up quickly!

Contact Rachel for more information

Monday, September 8, 2014

From 100 to 400


The farm truck just drove by my kitchen window.  About a dozen orange harvest baskets are stacked on the new flat bed, overflowing with weeds and old flowers from the flower garden.  CSA member and flower garden work share, Kathy, rides along with the bins, legs stretched out along open truck bed. Earlier this afternoon, Kathy told me that she had become ‘one with the weeds,’ this season.  True statement.  And as any volunteer or work share knows, we won’t hesitate to pull you into the patch of tall grass and spiky amaranth with us any day of the week, with the simple instructions, “pull” echoing from our lips.  
 
I walk outside to check on the irrigation, running for the past couple hours in the youngest cucumber planting and prepare to move the water over to tiny spinach plants, begging for moisture.  Down the farm road, a familiar painter pulls his car next to the pig pasture and sets up his easel and canvas and sets out on his work for the day.  Just beyond the artist, I see the Neighborhood farm crew packing and unpacking their cooler, organizing their veggies for the week of markets ahead.  I throw some “seconds” tomatoes to the chickens and peek in on the mama pigs, sleeping back to back in their long shed.  
garlic in the share again!

I step into the pick-your-own shed and see the turned over pint containers, empty shelves where the quart containers once were and search for the many missing scissors.  And I remember last Saturday; one of our busiest CSA pick up days that we have ever had!  Nearly two-hundred shareholders picked up during last Saturday’s pick up! That’s half of our entire membership!  In the first two hours alone, we had one hundred shares checked off our trusty clipboards.  I stood under the slight shade of the PYO shed and remembered back to when we had a total of one hundred members –throughout the whole week! I so clearly remember the days when we would pick for thirty or forty members in a morning.  Three of us, hustling, packing and moving veggies from fields to barn with a tiny wooden cart and mostly broken down blue dodge ram.  Now, we pick every day for one hundred to two hundred shares.  And on good days, when we have enough help and are slightly rested, we finish before lunch and are back in the fields weeding as the barn doors open and the distro begins.

Yesterday, on a Sunday walk with my partner and that crazy farm dog, we ran into some wonderful (they bring treats!), long-time shareholders, who commented on how quiet a day it was at the farm.  It is true that the quiet days are happening less and less every year; replacing it, a steady hum of activity, energy, trucks passing by, farm crews growing and shareholders multiplying.  I love the quiet days, the walks into the back fields, or my morning field walks on my own.  But the reality of people really living with this farm, truly enjoying and connecting with this farm and fields in real ways—taking the time to pick each week, or walk the fields, or stay late after the farm slows down to have a picnic dinner on the lawn—these are the moments I know that the farm has so far surpassed what I thought it would be during that first year.  I look back on the quiet days with fondness and treasure the moments where I can find them. I also want to celebrate, with you all, the life, energy, noise and many peaceful moments that we have all helped to nurture, sustain and grow on this beautiful farm.

I’ll see you in the fields, (I’ll be the one setting up irrigation by moonlight until the rain comes),

Meryl & the Powisset Farm Crew


***speaking of busy days at the farm….***

If you would like to be at the farm during our quieter hours, please visit us on Tuesday or Thursday.  Here are our hours: Tuesday: 1:30-6:30, Thursday: 10am-6:30pm and Saturday: 10am-5pm.  Those are the same as our pick your own hours. (although, we don’t mind if people come early on Saturday to do the PYO, come as early as 7am).  Remember, if you are sending a friend in your place; please remind them of our hours.  It’s quite a push to get everything ready by the time we open, so it’s tough when people come early!  Thank you!

***speaking of parking…***

Just to let you all know, we do have expanded parking areas coming soon, including a better and bigger area for handicap accessible parking closer to the barn entrance! 



 What’s in the share (most likely):
 
Full: lettuce, arugula, kale or chard, tomatoes and tomatillos, peppers, eggplant, carrots, onions, garlic, sweet corn (probably last week for this), maybe squash and/or cukes

Small: lettuce or arugula, kale or chard, tomatoes and tomatillos, peppers and eggplant, onions, garlic, sweet corn and maybe squash and/or cukes



What’s Cookin’ with Powisset Cooks!

Please note the schedule change for the next two Powisset Cooks! workshops:

THIS Sunday, September 14, 10AM-12PM
For the Pantry: Tomato Preservation

Do you have an abundance of tomatoes? Do you want to learn creative ways to savor these sweet treats of summer? Join Powisset Cooks! in the field for a short harvest followed by an exciting hands-on exploration in the kitchen with our Culinary Educator to create sauces, oven roasted tomatoes and more. Limited to 12 participants, so sign up quickly!



 
NEXT Tuesday, September 23 | 5:30-7:30PM

Herbs are one of the many unsung culinary heroes; when used well, herbs can add so much depth and flavor to a dish. Join Powisset Cooks! in the field for a short harvest followed by an exciting hands-on exploration in the kitchen with our Culinary Educator. You will learn new and easy ways to infuse herbs into breads, sauces and more. Limited to 12 participants, so sign up quickly!

 

Contact Rachel for more information



Bushel + Crumb Pies in the Farm Stand this week!

Summer is drifting away, but before we’re all wearing sweaters and trading sunburns for snowflakes, the expert pie bakers of Bushel + Crumb have planned a sweet ode to summer for their early September pie flavor: nectarine and blueberry with a lemon ginger crumble. Pies will be available starting this Thursday afternoon in the barn.


Get Your Sip On

We’re excited to bring a new product to the barn this month: Giv Coffee! Other than vegetables, coffee is likely the most near and dear item to our farmer hearts, and our coffee mugs are constant companions in the fields, next to tractor seats, on the truck dashboard . . . So we’re particularly thrilled that Giv not only roasts delicious coffee, but is also committed to integrity in sourcing and community investment. Giv was started in 2011 by a husband and wife team seeking to use coffee as a vehicle to connect communities in need with necessary resources, both abroad and locally. Already coffee connoisseurs and small-batch roasters, the folks at Giv Coffee began their organization with three critical goals: to source the highest quality green beans, with special attention to micro-lots, organic and farm-direct coffees; to purchase only fair-trade beans to ensure farmers are receiving a fair price for their crop; and, as the name says, giving back - $2 of every bag of coffee is returned back to the communities with whom Giv works. It tastes good and it does good, which is pretty great for your morning cup of joe. 

coffee team!

being really good at his job. thank you!

Monday, September 1, 2014

September Arrives!


It’s the end of the day on a Monday.  Today I walked the fields alone in the early morning, the mellow dew covered the tops of my boots and I let the early, hot sun touch my sleepy shoulders and warm my face in the light of a new month, September.  I let my mind wander into the far corners of the farm season by delighting in the newly sprouted cover crops scattered around our farm and thinking about how tall they would get before the first frost.  The first frost on the horizon? Are we already in that part of the season, on a day when I am sweating by 7:45am and Kasey is picking tender flowers by the truck load under already high sun?  

I walked on past patches of pristine crops, next to others hidden by weeds as tall as my dog.   The to-do list on my pocket sized notebook (with reminders of which tractors need oil changes written next to food shopping lists) was filled with tasks for the week, ideas for the month and changes for next season.  To me, September is the time of the season when I can start indulging in the ideas for next year.  With hours spent in the tomatoes, picking bucket upon bucket, I have time to imagine all the next- season- scenarios in which there are no weeds, the tomatoes are free of blight and never fall from inadequate trellising and there are plenty of people weeding and harvesting and they never get tired and everything is perfect.  This is the time of year when apprentices start to wonder where their path will take them next season and I when I start to fantasize about all the changes that will happen in future seasons when, in these imaginings, I have figure out how to have no weeds and no broken tractors and no sore back and oh I am so clever next season..   So, it is on this early morning walk, I let my task list grow and morph until it encompassed plans for next season, line after line.

kale for dinner!
I directed my blissfully sleepy body back to my home for that first cup of coffee to be sipped in total gratitude that the neighborhood farm was taking the day off, the maintenance team had the day off and so the farm was quiet, a rare thing these days.  Coffee time lingered until I met up with Tessa to craft our share for the week and make our actual plan for the days ahead; slimming down my six month plan written in tiny letters on that tiny notepad.  We lightened the load for the share this week, deciding that the last two shares had been quite hauls and in this week of transition from summer to fall for many of you a slightly smaller tow may be welcomed.  

From there Tessa and I went to inspire ourselves by the talented farmers at Tangerini’s Farm in Millis.  For hours, we took in the fields, corn and veggies as far as we could see.  We stole a minute of the farmers’ time, to connect on the seasons we have been having and I could see their thoughts flowing into future plans, reminiscent of my list from the early morning.  Every time I visit another farm’s operation I learn something.  Their stand, the shape of their share, the equipment they have, tractors (!), crew, the feel of the community.  We drove away between rows of almost-ripe apples and frosted purple cabbage leaves and I felt an inspired and completely grateful for the special farm community that exists and thrives in eastern Mass. 

Our farm visit was followed by field prep for the week and a massive egg collection for the next day’s stand.  And now it’s the end of a Monday, so I rode down the dark farm road to close the doors to the chickens, and continued on in the dim light of the half-moon to grab a kale bunch for dinner.  Navigating around the fields, in the dark makes me realize how well I know each divot, curve and edge of a field.  In the darkness I stripped a kale plant of its leaves, leaves that are praying for rain, pulled a rubber band around the stems and tried to take a big breath of air from this late summer night.  I took in September and exhaled August.  I’m going to pull that notebook from my back pocket, where it’s been all day, and see what kind of strange plans I made for my future.


See you in the fields (welcome to September at Powisset!)

Meryl & the farm crew


What's in the share (most likely):

Full: arugula, spinach or pea greens, bok choi or tatsoi, carrots & fennel, peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, melons, garlic

Small: arugula, choice of greens, carrots & fennel, peppers, eggplants, tomatoes, melons, garlic

PYO: husk cherries, cherry tomatoes, greens

peppers in the share again!

Winter Shares and Pork Shares for Sale!
potatoes! all winter!

Winter share:
With the summer CSA heading into its second half, we are thinking about our winter CSA!
  Join our winter CSA and continue to eat Powisset produce deep into the winter!  The winter share has: greens (kale, cabbage, collards, & more), potatoes, sweet potatoes, winter squash, beets, carrots, turnips, parsnips, rutabaga, onions, leeks, shallots, garlic and more!  There are four pick-ups, from the end of October through the middle of December.  We will give you a wide variety of produce, tips for storage and recipe suggestions.  

The winter share is a warm, festive time at the farm and we will do our best to provide you with as much variety as possible, as well as produce that is great for long-term storage.

Join us!  To sign up, please email: mlatronica@ttor.org
Or, sign up at the barn when you come for your share.
The cost of the Powisset Winter Share is $300

Dates and times of the 2014 winter share:
October 25
November 8
November 22
December 13


Pork Shares:

Powisset Farm is offering a Pork Share again this season.  The pork share is about 22 pounds of pork (or roughly a quarter pig).  There will be sausage, loin chops, country style ribs, spare ribs, ham slices (or ham roast), smoked ham hocks or pig feet, bacon included in the share.  The price will be $175.  If you are excited about getting a wide variety of pork from our very own Powisset-raised pigs, then this share is for you!  There will also be cuts of pork available at the farm if you just want a little pork and do not want to commit to a share.  

 There are a limited number of shares available; so we will sell shares at a first-come-first served basis.  Please contact Meryl at: mlatronica@ttor.org to sign up or with any questions.  You can also sign up at the barn.  Pick up for most of the share will happen in early September.


Monday, August 25, 2014

Cleaning Onions and Hauling Bags of Corn

This is a great time of year at our farm.  We are starting to cross that bridge between summer and fall.  It certainly felt like it last week, with cool days and nights.  Even though we watched our final plantings of summer squash and cucumbers stall and produce a little less, we relished in the vision of our fall crops flourishing in the mild days and dewy mornings.  As you can see from being at the stand, we are in the thick of the harvests, with tomatoes, eggplant and peppers filling entire tables, lettuce still booming out of the fields, the return of kale-bigger than ever- and the bags of sweet corn from Sunshine Farm, pouring right off the tables (the best corn is still on its way).


And then there were the onions.  The onions!  My favorite crop of all.  Last week, we hauled down too-heavy bins of cured onions from the top of our barn to clean and distribute for you.  I watched our Saturday morning volunteer crew clean and sort and fill the barn with onions for pick up last week and the smell and sight of that work made me know that fall was soon to follow.  

Onions that were seeded March 1, planted in April, harvested in July and cured in August were now heading to your homes.  The onions mimic my own season; getting to work early in the spring or late winter, growing strong tall greens, taking in and basking in the sunshine, rain and warmth of spring.  Then getting a bit tired in the hot days of summer and eventually letting the greens fall, indicating its readiness for harvest.  Then, several weeks in the barn to cure, or dry its greens, in order to make strong outer layers to ensure many months of storage.  I think that I am in my curing stage a little bit right now…my greens are wilting just a bit to indicate my tiredness from a busy summer, but it also means that I am preparing myself for a good, long winter full of energy that comes from within.  That is the farm season for me.  Just as it tires me out, it also fills my spirit with inspiration and endurance for the fall season.  And hopefully, like this year’s crop of onions, it will take me through until march, when we start to seed once again.

This week: summer meets fall, even when it’s hot out.


See you in the fields,

Meryl and the Powisset Farm Crew


What's in the share: (most likely):

Full & Small: Lettuce, choice of greens, peppers, eggplant/squash/cukes, onions, corn, tomatoes, carrots & fennel, choice of herbs and maybe melons!

PYO: cherry tomatoes, greens and maybe the first husk cherries!


Powisset Cooks!
 

The farm gets tastier every day thanks to Powisset Cooks!      

We’ve made sassy salads, pickled everything that wasn’t nailed down and explored the world of wild edibles.

What’s next you ask?
one of our breadmakers!
From the Fields:
Herb Breads and Tasty Herb Dipping Sauces
Sunday, September 14 | 10AM-12PM

Herbs are one of the many unsung culinary heroes; when used well, herbs can add so much depth and flavor to a dish. Join Powisset Cooks! in the field for a short harvest followed by an exciting hands-on exploration in the kitchen with our Culinary Educator. You will learn new and easy ways to infuse herbs into breads, sauces and more. Limited to 12 participants, so sign up quickly!

Cost: Members $35; Nonmembers: :$45


Contact Rachel for more information Information



Pies! Pies! Pies!


Dear Pie Fans,

We are offering special order pies on Thursday, August 28 to help you welcome September in style. It may be back to school time, but we’ll still be showcasing the delicious fruits of summer.
Pie share members will receive a savory pie in their share. We have both sweet and savory pies available for special order. Choose from:
  • Savory: Tomato, Mozzarella, and Basil Pie. This pie is a true celebration of the tomato. Filled with a colorful variety of heirloom tomatoes, herbs ,and fresh mozzarella, this pie shouts summer!
     
  • Sweet: Raspberry and Peach Clafoutis Pie. A clafoutis folds fresh fruit in a just-sweetened custard. We lighten ours by using thick yogurt in the custard, which adds a brightness and slight tart contrast to the ripe fruit.
   

Small (6″) pies are $13 and Large (9″) pies are $22.

Click here to order a pie (or pies) for pick-up on Thursday, August 28. Be sure to select your pickup location. Email us for information about picking up in Jamaica Plain or Rutland.

Orders must be received by 5 pm on Tuesday, August 26 to guarantee your pie. Please contact us at info@bushelandcrumb.com with any questions. We will email you to confirm your order.

Happy Summer!

Simca and Lauren
Bushel + Crumb
 
 

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Happy Half-Birthday to our Farm Season!



I’m sitting in the barn on a Tuesday afternoon (a little late to the blogging this week…).  I watched as Tessa bent her knees and leaned into the big red barn door to slide it open and start distribution for the twelfth week of our 2014 season.  A few members, squinting into the sun outside the barn, walked in toward the tomatoes, lettuce, corn and all that waits, fresh picked just for them.  Twelve weeks.  More than halfway through our 20-week summer CSA season.
scallion harvest!

The halfway point of a CSA season has always felt very significant to me.  In life we have birthdays, anniversaries, and rituals to mark the passing of time.  To celebrate special moments in time, or remember people/times or places that are important to us.  We don’t have any special celebrations to mark the middle of our CSA season, but it tends to line up with some big changes, and big changes at our farm usually mean lots of treats and lots of reflection!  

At the half way point, I like to celebrate our crew and celebrate the end of our summer crews’ season, which ended last week. Losing our four pickers and weeders, their spirit, their hard work, their bodies in the fields helping to lift and smile and sing, is a big change to our farm team.  We go back to our crew of five full-timers and wonder how we will ever pick all those tomatoes.  At the halfway point, I like to celebrate the numbers.  Numbers of hours worked (we each average 80 a week), numbers of plants planted and harvested (this is likely in the 100,000s).  Numbers of days left until fall (35).   At the halfway point I like to look at back at what we have harvested so far—last week we calculated that we had already harvested 10,000 heads of lettuce in 10 weeks—and take one small moment to appreciate all that it took to produce the food we have already harvested and how much we have all feasted on that bounty.
fennel is back!

At the halfway point I look out to the fields to see what is to come.  Winter radishes, turnips and rutabaga are thriving in the warm soil, ready to be thinned for their last month of growing.  The youngest carrots, planted for our winter CSA, are a few inches tall and growing more every minute.  Our massive (truly massive) onion harvest is curing in every possible barn space at the farm, preparing for long-term storage.  And our summer crops are flourishing; the peppers and eggplants are more beautiful than ever and just this morning we hauled in over 1000 pounds of tomatoes. 

With the season going at full speed it’s difficult to stop and sing happy half-birthday to our farm.  But, at least we can sing half of the song and take pride in that we have grown so far.  How has the first half of the season felt to you?  What are some of the milestones you mark the summer with?  Are those moments connected to the farm?  Are they connected to your first bite of cherry tomatoes?  For me the halfway point is a good time for a piece of blueberry pie, a moment of reflection and a time to gather my strength and spirit to give the next ten weeks as much energy and attention as the first 10 received!  Happy halfway birthday, Powisset Farm CSA!
so many beautiful flowers in the stand lately!


See you in the fields, (singing happy birthday),

Meryl & the Powisset Farm Crew



What’s in the share this week (most likely):

Full: lettuce, kale, greens mix, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, tomatillos, corn, beets, fennel, carrots, onions
Small: lettuce, choice of greens, peppers, eggplants, tomatoes, corn, beets, fennel, carrots, onions

PYO: cherry tomatoes, raspberries, flowers, parsley





Come one, Come all to the Powisset Cooks Pickling Extravaganza!
This Thursday, Aug 21 from 4-6PM

Wondering what to do with your abundance of cucumbers? Join Powisset Cooks! in the field for a short harvest followed by an exciting hands-on exploration in the kitchen with our Culinary Educators to learn the fine art of pickle making. Limited to 12 participants, so sign up quickly!

This class will be co-taught by Ken Cmar, the longest running chef at Cuisine en Locale, the premier "locavore" caterer in the Boston Area. Cuisine en Locale is dedicated to using only the absolute farm freshest, local ingredients (down to the salt and oil) in every dish made. No exceptions, save a few exotic spices.

Ken got the pickling bug from his Hungarian grandmother, who had a German restaurant which featured ingredients grown in the garden behind the restaurant. Picking and preserving is essential at Cuisine en Locale, enabling the catering company to use local ingredients even in the darkest days of winter. 




Winter Shares and Pork Shares for Sale!
 
Winter CSA:
potatoes! all winter!



With the summer CSA heading into its second half, we are thinking about our winter CSA!
  Join our winter CSA and continue to eat Powisset produce deep into the winter!  The winter share has: greens (kale, cabbage, collards, & more), potatoes, sweet potatoes, winter squash, beets, carrots, turnips, parsnips, rutabaga, onions, leeks, shallots, garlic and more!  There are four pick-ups, from the end of October through the middle of December.  We will give you a wide variety of produce, tips for storage and recipe suggestions.  

The winter share is a warm, festive time at the farm and we will do our best to provide you with as much variety as possible, as well as produce that is great for long-term storage.

Join us!  To sign up, please email: mlatronica@ttor.org
Or, sign up at the barn when you come for your share.
The cost of the Powisset Winter Share is $300

Dates and times of the 2014 winter share:
October 25
November 8
November 22
December 13


Pork Shares:

Powisset Farm is offering a Pork Share again this season.  The pork share is about 22 pounds of pork (or roughly a quarter pig).  There will be sausage, loin chops, country style ribs, spare ribs, ham slices (or ham roast), smoked ham hocks or pig feet, bacon included in the share.  The price will be $175.  If you are excited about getting a wide variety of pork from our very own Powisset-raised pigs, then this share is for you!  There will also be cuts of pork available at the farm if you just want a little pork and do not want to commit to a share.  

 There are a limited number of shares available; so we will sell shares at a first-come-first served basis.  Please contact Meryl at: mlatronica@ttor.org to sign up or with any questions.  You can also sign up at the barn.  Pick up for most of the share will happen in early September.