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Monday, September 30, 2013

The Fields at Dusk


oats holding the soil for winter

Walking the fields on a Monday evening at dusk is one of my favorite moments of each week.  I walk out just as the sun dips far enough below the trees and the light changes enough for me to pull the rim of my baseball cap to the side, no need to shade my eyes from the bright sun of the day that is drawing to a close.  This Monday, that perfect time of night arrived early (before 6!) and I pulled on a warm, hooded sweatshirt, left my dog and my notebook in the house to ensure a walk that would be quiet and slow, designed for all of my senses to simply appreciate all that I was about to see. 

I walked past the broccoli fields and the kale; dark green leaves standing tall and eager to be touched by frost to sweeten up.  I passed patches of cover crops, small oats that had grown a few inches tall where there had been beets and lettuce and mustard greens.  At the tip of each blade, a small drop of dew had formed and at that moment it was difficult to tell if it was morning or night.  As I walked past the dew-covered field, and towards a low point in the back field where the potatoes are planted, the temperature fell and I pulled my hood over my ears.  I gasped a little when I realized that October had arrived on the farm, bringing fall, bringing the end to another summer at Powisset Farm. 

carnivale!
Walking along the rows of potatoes, I counted twenty-two rows that lay in the fields side by side like ocean waves coming in to the meet the beach, one after another after another.  I figured that more than 8000 pounds of potatoes lay under those waves, waiting to be harvested by our five sets of hands that are working the fields until the soil is too frozen to pry those spuds from.  I envisioned our race against that cold as I glimpsed to either side of the rows of tubers to see beets and turnips and rutabaga; an acre of storage crops eager to be picked. 

popcorn!
Ducking under the fence and heading across the fields by way of the popcorn and squash-filled greenhouse, I walked up and down rows of cabbage and red romaine lettuce and radicchio that glowed greens and magenta even in the dusk.  I looked to the edges of the field at the stretched out row of diakon radish tops and at the golden weeds growing up around the electric fence and at the eggplant and peppers dripping off of their plants.  It has been a challenging growing season with extreme temperatures—early frosts, and intense heat waves and weeks without water, and weeks with too much water all at the worst moments—and yet, here I am standing in fields filled with food for our last two weeks of summer CSA and our season of winter CSA about to begin.  And every time I walk these fields at dusk on a Monday, I see something different.  I am in awe of the constant changes in the fields, at the way a bed of arugula is cleared in three days to feed us all, in the way that the popcorn is dry and brown when only last week it glowed green in the distance. 

radicchio!   
In October we will eat squash and wear sweaters when we harvest and my field walks will get earlier and earlier.  And they will still be my favorite moment of the week. Join me for a walk sometime.

See you in the fields,

Meryl & the Powisset Farm Crew






 Pork Shares For Sale:

Powisset Farm is offering a Pork Share again this season.  The pork share is about 25 pounds of pork (or roughly a quarter pig).  There will be sausage, loin chops, country style ribs, spare ribs, ham slices (or ham roast), ham hocks, bacon and feet included in the share.  The price will be $160 (although, it may a little less or more than this depending on total weight of your box).  If you are excited about getting a wide variety of pork from our very own Powisset-raised pigs, then this share is for you!  There will also be cuts of pork available at the farm if you just want a little pork and do not want to commit to a share.  

 There are a limited number of shares available; so we will sell shares at a first-come-first served basis.  Please contact me at: mlatronica@ttor.org to sign up.  Pick up of the pork share will most likely be Friday, October 4th and Saturday the 5th.


Winter Shares for Sale!

Our summer CSA will be wrapping up in four weeks, but the veggies don’t have to end!  Join our winter CSA and continue to eat Powisset produce deep into the winter!  The winter share has: greens (kale, cabbage, collards, & more), potatoes, sweet potatoes, winter squash, beets, carrots, turnips, parsnips, rutabaga, onions, leeks, shallots, garlic and more!  There are four pick ups, from the end of October through the middle of December.  We will give you a wide variety of produce, tips for storage and recipe suggestions.  The winter share is a warm, festive time at the farm and we will do our best to provide you with as much variety as possible, as well as produce that is great for long-term storage.

Join us!  To sign up, please email: mlatronica@ttor.org
Or, sign up at the barn when you come for your share.

Dates and times of the 2013 winter share:
October 26
November 9
November 23
December 14

All pick-ups are at the farm from 10am-3pm
Cost of the winter share: $275


Two more weeks!
This is week 18 of our summer CSA! We will end our summer season on October 12. 
Our farm stand will be open through the 26th of October, open all three days a week.  Our stand will also be open on November 9th and 23rd and December 14 during our winter share hours.


What's in the share: 
In the barn: sweet potatoes, pumpkins, winter squash, purple top turnips, lettuce, eggplant, peppers
In the fields: cornstalks (bring clippers), hot peppers, parsley, dill flowers, kale or chard





Monday, September 23, 2013

Everyday is a Fall Festival



On Sunday morning I woke early to the sights of tiny raindrops on the gray sky through the windows, and the sound of the wind and rain gently landing on the farm road outside my door.  I smiled and closed my eyes to capture the few last moments of a quiet Sunday before the dog woke up and demanded a walk.  As the coffee was brewing I walked out the door in pajamas and rain boots and let the dog wander ahead of me towards the barn.  The festival tent had collapsed with the weight of the rain and the strength of the wind and I took it as a sign that I did the right thing by canceling the festival.  I hurried to put bits of the tent to the side in my funny morning outfit, making sure it was a safe, fallen tent and then headed towards home to drink the first cup of the day. 

By the end of that first cup of coffee, the sun’s power and glory was pushing apart the gray making a home for herself over the fields, the sky glowing blue, the morning turning into the best first day of fall ever.  After breakfast and more caffeine, I walked back outside to assess the beauty of the day.  I ran into an old family friend who had driven over for the party and even met a man who had farmed these same fields in the late 80’s, making hay and caring for animals here in Dover.  I met a young mom and her two beautiful, young children, as they played in the new sail boat and picked raspberries.  I met folks who were visiting Powisset for the very first time.  I tried my best not to feel too bad about trusting the rainy weather report and appreciated that this farm, festival or no festival, attracts so many visitors and on such a beautiful first day of fall, walking and sitting in the sun and seeing the fields and the trees was a pretty great thing to do. 

There are three weeks remaining in our Summer CSA season and each day we distribute feels like a festival.  The energy that you, our members, bring to the farm each Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday is full and bursting and moving and inspires me—a pretty tired farmer at the end of a challenging season—to walk with a little more bounce in my step and a little more speed with which to do my work.  In the next month, our farm crew will harvest thousands of pounds of sweet potatoes, potatoes, roots and greens.  We will dismantle tomato trellis and pull up plastic mulch covered in rotten tomatoes.  We will put a new roof on the greenhouse and pull the ginger from the hoop house.  We will prepare fields and plant garlic and built compost piles.  And in that time, the leaves will change and the mornings will grow colder and the shares will be filled with squash and dirty roots.  And even though the festival was canceled, the spirit of that exciting celebration and the feeling of joy and of positive energy and gratitude fills this farm each week because of each one of us who is connected to Powisset.

Happy fall! See you in the fields,

Meryl & the Powisset Farm Crew
(I’ll be the one wearing the purple winter hat)



Pork Shares For Sale:

Powisset Farm is offering a Pork Share again this season.  The pork share is about 25 pounds of pork (or roughly a quarter pig).  There will be sausage, loin chops, country style ribs, spare ribs, ham slices (or ham roast), ham hocks, bacon and feet included in the share.  The price will be $160 (although, it may a little less or more than this depending on total weight of your box).  If you are excited about getting a wide variety of pork from our very own Powisset-raised pigs, then this share is for you!  There will also be cuts of pork available at the farm if you just want a little pork and do not want to commit to a share.  

 There are a limited number of shares available; so we will sell shares at a first-come-first served basis.  Please contact me at: mlatronica@ttor.org to sign up.  Pick up of the pork share will most likely be Friday, October 4th and Saturday the 5th.


 The CSA Survival Guide:
Powisset Farm recently partnered with writer, Heather Vitella, to produce the Powisset Farm CSA Survival guide. Have you ever struggled to figure out how to properly and efficiently use and store your CSA bounty?  Heather's guide may be just what you need.  Heather has worked with many local farms, to help guide you through your CSA experience in a positive and helpful way. Check out her description below.  She will be selling the e-book online for $8.  

CSA Survival Guide 
  
When you compare your weekly CSA share with similar items purchased at a local, organic grocery store, you will be astounded at the value you are getting.  But a big part of managing that value is properly storing the produce when you get home.  While most items benefit from refrigerator time, there is a big difference in shelf life when you store items washed or unwashed, in plastic, paper bags or just loose.  
 
  The CSA Survival Guide walks you through this with details on every item we grow.  Click on the link and head over to Cover Crop Marketing to learn more.  
 
To purchase an online book, follow this link: http://covercropmarketing.com/generalcsaguide
Check it out!!  Great for storing your winter veggies!!
What's in the share:
in the barn:  hakurei turnips, radishes, tatsoi, kale or collards, peppers, eggplant, delicata squash, potatoes, onions, maybe broccoli!
in the fields: hot peppers, kale or chard, dill & parsley





Saturday, September 21, 2013

Fall Festival Canceled!

Powisset Fall Festival: CANCELED!

The Powisset Fall Festival has been canceled due to rainy weather! 
 We won't be rescheduling this event, however we may pull out the cider press later in the season to make good use of all those apples we picked!  

Enjoy your rainy day, 

Meryl & the Powisset Farm Crew

Monday, September 16, 2013

Field Edges and Farm Festivals



On Saturday evening the Powisset Farm Crew closed the big red barn door to end our fifteenth week of CSA distributions.  We turned the music up loud and hauled the remaining veggies into the cooler, counted and stacked the bins, swept the wash area and drove the rotten tomatoes out to the compost.  I walked down the farm road with my bags filled with veggies, bunches of kale sticking out over the top of the totes, onions and summer squash from the stand making the bags weigh heavy on my shoulders.  I had a lot of plans for my weekend cooking adventures.  After passing the fields and the few remaining families hunting for the last of the husk cherries, I made it home, piled my bags on the kitchen table and grabbed the leash and the dog. 

Henry and I walked into the fields side by side as I closed the gates behind me; the last task to end this September work week.  We walked to the very back corner of the field, to the end of a row of turnips, ready for winter storage.  I looked back at the farm road and noticed how different everything looks from the edges of the field.  Even though I have spent days and months and years looking at these fields and rows of crops growing and being turned-in and growing again, I found myself in a corner of the farm on this almost-fall day, with the light dimming and the leaves starting to turn and it felt like I was looking at a whole new farm. 

That transition from Summer to Fall at the farm, often makes me feel like I am working at a new farm. Our pace changes, our tasks shift from harvesting tomatoes to pulling out tomato stakes. To mark this change, I like to make bread and pick flowers and have farm festivals and press cider and walk to the edges of the fields so that the farm looks as different as it feels.  Next week I’ll tell you about Bread Day and we’ll reflect on our wonderful Fall Festival (which, by the way, is this Sunday, September 22 from 10-3pm).

I’ll see you at the farm,


Meryl & the Powisset Farm Crew



Fall Festival! This Sunday, September 22 10am-3pm

Join us this Sunday, September 22 for the Powisset Farm Fall Festival!
It is time again for the wonderful and amazing fall festival!  The fall festival will be a chance for us all to come together and celebrate Fall on the Farm!  We are winding down our farm season and want to spend time with you, our farm community, to celebrate our 2013 farm season!  There will be live music and vendors (food/crafts and more!), farm tours, activities for kids and Powisset Farm produce for sale!  The event is free and open to all!  I hope that you can come celebrate the farm and fall with us!

When: This Sunday, September 22 10am-3pm
Where: Powisset Farm!
Free and open to all! 
Why: So much fun!



Winter Shares for Sale!

Our summer CSA will be wrapping up in four weeks, but the veggies don’t have to end!  Join our winter CSA and continue to eat Powisset produce deep into the winter!  The winter share has: greens (kale, cabbage, collards, & more), potatoes, sweet potatoes, winter squash, beets, carrots, turnips, parsnips, rutabaga, onions, leeks, shallots, garlic and more!  There are four pick ups, from the end of October through the middle of December.  We will give you a wide variety of produce, tips for storage and recipe suggestions.  The winter share is a warm, festive time at the farm and we will do our best to provide you with as much variety as possible, as well as produce that is great for long-term storage.

Join us!  To sign up, please email: mlatronica@ttor.org
Or, sign up at the barn when you come for your share.

Dates and times of the 2013 winter share:
October 26
November 9
November 23
December 14

All pick-ups are at the farm from 10am-3pm
Cost of the winter share: $275


What's in the share:

Up at the barn: lettuce, turnips, radishes, napa or chard, peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, onions
In the fields: husk cherries, herbs, last of the cherry tomatoes




Tuesday, September 10, 2013

The Most Perfect Vegetable

Today I picked the perfect tomato.  I’m sure of it.  There were six of us, crawling along our four hundred foot beds of tomato plants, in a field we call, ‘Maine,’ and I found it. The one.  I was working opposite one of our regular harvest volunteers.  We were making our way down the row, one bucket at a time, both of us on our knees-- my left leg in the lead, working together with my left arm that held tightly to the harvest bin for support, my right leg being towed behind my body, trying to keep up with the picking that my right hand was doing.  It was raining slightly and I imagined what kind of crazy song and dance Donald O’Connor might do with the wild choreography that comes naturally when we are picking tomatoes.

In the midst of this tangle of limbs and bins and rows that go on and on, I reached into the middle of a beefsteak plant and extracted the most beautiful tomato of the season.  Deep red, at least 10 ounces, folded slightly up on its stem.  It resembled a kidney bean or a heart, with a slight blemish on the bottom of the fruit that had been healed over cleanly.  The perfect tomato.  I held it up, admiring it, showing it off to my harvest partner across the trellised row from me.  To my astonishment, he was not as wowed as I was.  I exclaimed that it was indeed the perfect tomato and he gave his best effort to offer me a small shred of agreement.  But a minute later, held up his own version of a perfect tomato, exclaiming with that same pride and wonderment that I had felt about my find.

How do you know the perfect tomato when you see it?  Or the perfect squash? Or pepper, or eggplant or any vegetable? All season we harvest thousands of pounds of vegetables, each one unique, beautiful, oddly shaped, hilarious, rotten, or sweet smelling.  Sometimes I find them perfect because I remember seeding them and I am in awe that they grew.  Sometimes I find them perfect because they were one covered in weeds, but were freed by our crew and thrived--becoming this beautiful food.  Sometimes it is the day, the light, or the person I am picking with who may see beauty where I may see imperfection.

Here at Powisset, I have picked so many perfect tomatoes, and peppers and onions and kale and cabbage...  They are perfect because I feel connected to this food we grow and the land from where it comes.  When I shop at a grocery store or even at a farmer’s market, I am not so quick to find perfection in those crops.  I often wonder (or hope) if someone else held that chard bunch in her hand, admiring it for just a moment too long, filling her heart with inspiration before packing it in a bin and sending it off. 

I wonder if you ate that perfect tomato that I picked.  I wonder how many perfect tomatoes you have found on our share table, or cherry tomatoes out in the fields, or carrot bunches, or heads of lettuce?  Maybe tomorrow I will pick the next most perfect tomato of the season.  Maybe you will.

See you in the fields,

Meryl & the Powisset Farm Crew





bushel + crumb pies
The pies are back this week, with the promise of a new delicious, sweet flavor. To celebrate the last days of summer, the bakers have prepared a plum frangipane. As usual, if you have a pie share, please collect your pie; and if you are interested in purchasing a pie, we'll have a small number for sale at the farm store. Below is a little more information about the pie and its inspiration from the bakers themselves:

Fall is in the air with cooler nights and beautiful, crisp days.  While the seasons may be about to change, we're not quite ready to give up on summer and it's bountiful fruits.  So this week's pie celebrates great late summer stone fruit in a plum frangipane pie.

Frangipane is a nutty pastry cream most commonly made with almonds that pairs especially well with stone fruits.  Almonds are in the same plant family as stone fruits like plums, peaches, and apricots.  If you can successfully crack open the pit of a peach you'll see an almond shaped seed inside and the botanical connection becomes obvious.  There's a great new cookbook by acclaimed author Deborah Madison called Vegetable Literacy that explores this very idea that shared plant families can be a good indicator of interesting flavor combinations.  Check it out if you want to learn more about the botanical connections between different fruits, vegetables, herbs and flowers, learn some great new recipes, and look at vegetables in a totally new light.  


Ride for Food!

 
Hi. My name is Deb Albenberg and I've been thrilled to help out at Powisset this season weeding, planting, and harvesting since May. I wanted to reach out to CSA members, Powisset friends and all the folks who help make this farm the amazing place that it is. I'm asking for your support now because next Sunday I'll be biking 25 miles with my uncle with the Ride for Food. The ride supports local food pantries like the Dedham Food Pantry, which Powisset donates to and Open Table, where my uncle works. The food that comes out these fields is a blessing to us all. Please help me in supporting the amazing work local food pantries take on and help us all share in the bounty. 

Thanks everyone!
Deb


What's in the share:
in the barn: lettuce, carrots, hakurei turnips, maybe broccoi, peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, 
kale or napa cabbage
in the fields: husk cherries, the last of the cherry tomatoes, parsley, dill, raspberries

The Most Perfect Vegetable.



Today I picked the perfect tomato.  I’m sure of it.  There were six of us, crawling along our four hundred foot beds of tomato plants, in a field we call, ‘Maine,’ and I found it. The one.  I was working opposite one of our regular harvest volunteers.  We were making our way down the row, one bucket at a time, both of us on our knees-- my left leg in the lead, working together with my left arm that held tightly to the harvest bin for support, my right leg being towed behind my body, trying to keep up with the picking that my right hand was doing.  It was raining slightly and I imagined what kind of crazy song and dance Donald O’Connor might do with the wild choreography that comes naturally when we are picking tomatoes.

In the midst of this tangle of limbs and bins and rows that go on and on, I reached into the middle of a beefsteak plant and extracted the most beautiful tomato of the season.  Deep red, at least 10 ounces, folded slightly up on its stem.  It resembled a kidney bean or a heart, with a slight blemish on the bottom of the fruit that had been healed over cleanly.  The perfect tomato.  I held it up, admiring it, showing it off to my harvest partner across the trellised row from me.  To my astonishment, he was not as wowed as I was.  I exclaimed that it was indeed the perfect tomato and he gave his best effort to offer me a small shred of agreement.  But a minute later, held up his own version of a perfect tomato, exclaiming with that same pride and wonderment that I had felt about my find.

How do you know the perfect tomato when you see it?  Or the perfect squash? Or pepper, or eggplant or any vegetable? All season we harvest thousands of pounds of vegetables, each one unique, beautiful, oddly shaped, hilarious, rotten, or sweet smelling.  Sometimes I find them perfect because I remember seeding them and I am in awe that they grew.  Sometimes I find them perfect because they were one covered in weeds, but were freed by our crew and thrived--becoming this beautiful food.  Sometimes it is the day, the light, or the person I am picking with who may see beauty where I may see imperfection.

Here at Powisset, I have picked so many perfect tomatoes, and peppers and onions and kale and cabbage...  They are perfect because I feel connected to this food we grow and the land from where it comes.  When I shop at a grocery store or even at a farmer’s market, I am not so quick to find perfection in those crops.  I often wonder (or hope) if someone else held that chard bunch in her hand, admiring it for just a moment too long, filling her heart with inspiration before packing it in a bin and sending it off. 

I wonder if you ate that perfect tomato that I picked.  I wonder how many perfect tomatoes you have found on our share table, or cherry tomatoes out in the fields, or carrot bunches, or heads of lettuce?  Maybe tomorrow I will pick the next most perfect tomato of the season.  Maybe you will.

See you in the fields,

Meryl & the Powisset Farm Crew





bushel + crumb pies
 
The pies are back this week, with the promise of a new delicious, sweet flavor. To celebrate the last days of summer, the bakers have prepared a plum frangipane. As usual, if you have a pie share, please collect your pie; and if you are interested in purchasing a pie, we'll have a small number for sale at the farm store. Below is a little more information about the pie and its inspiration from the bakers themselves:

Fall is in the air with cooler nights and beautiful, crisp days.  While the seasons may be about to change, we're not quite ready to give up on summer and it's bountiful fruits.  So this week's pie celebrates great late summer stone fruit in a plum frangipane pie.

Frangipane is a nutty pastry cream most commonly made with almonds that pairs especially well with stone fruits.  Almonds are in the same plant family as stone fruits like plums, peaches, and apricots.  If you can successfully crack open the pit of a peach you'll see an almond shaped seed inside and the botanical connection becomes obvious.  There's a great new cookbook by acclaimed author Deborah Madison called Vegetable Literacy that explores this very idea that shared plant families can be a good indicator of interesting flavor combinations.  Check it out if you want to learn more about the botanical connections between different fruits, vegetables, herbs and flowers, learn some great new recipes, and look at vegetables in a totally new light.  
 


Ride for Food!
 
 
 
Hi. My name is Deb Albenberg and I've been thrilled to help out at Powisset this season weeding, planting, and harvesting since May. I wanted to reach out to CSA members, Powisset friends and all the folks who help make this farm the amazing place that it is. I'm asking for your support now because next Sunday I'll be biking 25 miles with my uncle with the Ride for Food. The ride supports local food pantries like the Dedham Food Pantry, which Powisset donates to and Open Table, where my uncle works. The food that comes out these fields is a blessing to us all. Please help me in supporting the amazing work local food pantries take on and help us all share in the bounty. 
 
 
Here's the link for the ride: http://threesquaresne.org/

Thanks everyone!
Deb

Monday, September 2, 2013

Driving With Chickens



Tonight I took a chicken for a ride in the four-wheeler.  Yup.  Just me and a beautiful, shimmery-black chicken named Freddie, gliding down the farm road in the little, green Gator as the sun set over the fields.  Freddie had been living in my mini, backyard chicken coop for the last couple months and I finally decided it was time to return her to the chicken gang up near the barn.  I waited until dusk, pulled her from her slumber and onto my lap and set out slowly for our ride from one end of the farm to the other.  I held her warm chicken body to my lap and belly with my right arm, her wings tucked in under my arms, but her head free to look around at the world around us.  Her neck extended and moved left and right, her eyes at full attention taking in the fields and sky and road.  She seemed truly alarmed, but she didn’t try to escape my grasp.  When I placed her in the chicken coop, she jumped up on a perch next to another shimmery black chicken, settling in like it was just another night. 
powisset cherry tomatoes

I hopped back on the Gator and slowly began the ride home.  I saw hula hoops and toys, pulled from the barn and left near the flower garden, evidence of a busy Saturday pick up full of games and wild imaginations.  I glanced at the herb garden where some of our CSA members and friends had weeded this weekend, the piles of weeds reflecting hours of hard work and care and love for our fields and flowers.  I pulled into the fields and crept along each row, jotting down notes for the week and finally getting a clearer picture of what the share was going to look and feel like this week.  And what it was going to feel like to harvest this week with crew members on vacation or away for Holidays.  My eyes strained to see in the dusk what the basil looked like and whether the chard looked good for picking or if I needed to wait a week before harvesting.  My neck moved up and down and side to side as I peered under and over eggplants, estimating the yield that we may be able to harvest this week.

The list of things to harvest was steadily creeping down the page and the list of things to weed was growing shorter by the week.  By looking at this list in front of me, glowing now in the light of my headlamp, I knew that September was here.  On the list: pick tomatoes (thousands of them), harvest peppers and eggplant (finally), bunch cilantro, weed celeriac, harvest winter squash, clean and sort the onions.  Our tasks of Summer and Fall are blending on the page—harvesting for the winter CSA in the same week as we will likely pull in another thousand pounds of tomatoes!  My eyes bounced around the now-dark farm, from the fields onto the pages of my notebook and I started to piece together plans for our next eight weeks of the season—that special time when fall arrives at the farm.

my favorite tomato of the week.
I turned off the head lamp and drove the Gator back to my house, navigating the fields in the medium darkness, mostly out of instinct, knowing each bump and turn so well after these seven years.  Like the chicken seemed, I was slightly alarmed-- at the tasks ahead of me, of the pounds of produce to harvest and the not-too-distant cold weather.  But, I arrived home, jumped out and into my house, fell into my comfy chair next to my dog Henry and settled in for the night.  Tomorrow the fields will be ready to work as the always are and the to-do list will be written and the squash and tomatoes will be harvested.

See you in the fields!
(I’ll be wearing the button that says, ‘I love September)

Meryl & the Powisset Farm Crew




The Powisset 4-H Club goes to the Worcester County Fair!

On Sunday, August 25th, the Powisset Farm Hens and Hogs 4-H club showed their pigs at the Worcester County 4-H Fair. Eight youth from Medfield, Millis, Needham and Westwood successfully participated in showmanship, fitting and breed competitions. We are so proud of our amazing young people who have learned about and cared for our Powisset pigs!  Our 4-H club will be at our fall festival--I hope you will all ask them all about their awesome time at the fair!



Back row: Ben Adjami, Westwood; Matt Monroe, Millis; Gabe Springer, Medfield; 
James Benner, Needham
Front row: Hannah Jordanides, Westwood; Ava Butler, Westwood; Stephanie Moran, Westwood,
 Luke Butler, Westwood; Jane D'Abate, Medfield


Save the Date! Powisset Farm Fall Festival!

When: Sunday, September 22 10am-3pm
Where: Powisset Farm
Why: It's awesome! Music! Cider pressing! Great vendors! Fun!
Who: You and me and all of our friends!


What's in the Share:

In the barn: arugula, lettuce, cilantro or fennel, tomatoes, peppers, sweet corn, spinach or tatsoi, 
onions or scallions, maybe eggplant (plants not yielding well this season!)
In the fields: last of the beans, dill, husk cherries, cherry tomatoes